Sacred Architecture 'to scan or not to scan, that is the question'?

There are still certain aspects of shooting film that I miss, I think!
Could it have been the anticipation of a shoot as I took the rolls of film out of the fridge and packed them carefully in the bag? Or was it the lovely peppermint flavour on the tongue as I licked the wrapping band on another completed roll of Agfa's 120 roll film?
I think probably neither, but I do have a lot of images that were shot on film 'back in the day', and very rarely do they see the light of day.

 The Cathedral from Hope Street

The Cathedral from Hope Street

In 2003 I was commissioned by Bluecoat Press, Liverpool, to shoot all the contemporary photography for a book about Liverpool Cathedral, at the time digital photography wasn't up to the job and looking back now as a Phase One user I think this was the right decision.

 Looking toward the High Altar from the West Door

Looking toward the High Altar from the West Door

After editing I submitted about six hundred transparency's for consideration, the selected transparency's were sent for scanning and then returned to me and have been sat in a 'Secol' archival box ever since.

Earlier this year I was contacted by Craig Hamilton Architects to use images from the book to accompany an article in the American publication 'Sacred Architecture Journal'.

http://www.craighamiltonarchitects.com

 Lady Chapel from the gallery

Lady Chapel from the gallery

Like the rest of us I've got use to the convenience of our digital world, the original scans were never given to me so I contacted the publisher, 'no problem' came the reply, ‘we'll send you all of the scans' unfortunately only three of the six images were in their archive, I had to scan the other three and this led me to notice some deterioration on the transparencies.

 The inner doors of the Rankin Porch

The inner doors of the Rankin Porch

Now I've discovered that the publishing house doesn't hold a copy of the transparencies and I’ve seen the start of some deterioration I need to treat this as a wake up call for the several thousand unscanned transparencies I have and think about my own archive. The question now is how to get the best out of them? still it’s nice to see the images in print again.

 Ordination service

Ordination service

Sacred Architecture Journal, a publication of the Institute for Sacred Architecture, is dedicated to a renewal of beauty in contemporary church design. Through its scholarly articles on architectural history, principles of design, and contemporary buildings, the Journal seeks to inspire and inform.

http://www.sacredarchitecture.org

A shift in perspective

I don't normally blog about gear, but!
I've just taken delivery of a Schneider Kreuznach PC-TS Apo-Digitar 5.6/120 HM Aspheric lens, and as it's name suggests this is a complex piece of kit.

 Lens with all settings zeroed

Lens with all settings zeroed

It's not a lens for people that shoot thousands of images over a weekend in the hope that one or two of them may turn out to be good picture, it's a complex tool for photographers that want to craft their images and look that bit further when working a shoot.

 Full Tilt and shift applied

Full Tilt and shift applied

Tilt can be used technically, creating images with increased depth of field using the Scheimpflug principle and shift for correcting converging verticals. It's also possible to use the tilt artistically by dropping focus out, I know people will say that this 'look' can be achieved in post production, doing this would be nothing but a pale imitation of what this lens can achieve.

 The lens has its own tripod mount

The lens has its own tripod mount

This is a lens that requires a lot of thought and patience in its operation, it has large format quality and versatility with medium format convenience.

 Built in lens hood

Built in lens hood

Using its offset focus plane it's perfect for studio work, product shots and for creating stunning images, 8° tilt, 12mm shift, rotating lens groups 360° on both axes, no flare, even at extreme angles.

I love it!

Migration

Back in 2008 I was in Liverpool Cathedral photographing 'For You' by Tracey Emin, this shoot was commissioned by White Cube in London and soon after White Cube contacted me and asked if I could photograph 'Roman Standard', Emin's other piece in Liverpool. Roman Standard is normally next to the Cathedral in the grounds of the Oratory and is a tribute to Liverpool's famed liver Bird, this was Emin's first public art project, often mistaken as a real bird it is a symbol of 'hope, faith and spirituality'.
Now it's flown south and will be on display in the courtyard of Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, West Sussex until 7th May 2018 as part of Young British Artists exhibition. One of my images from the Oratory shoot has been used in the Friends magazine.

 Page from the Friends magazine

Page from the Friends magazine

Taynish Peninsular

A short September break found me in Scotland close to Lochgilphead, very mixed weather for the week and not much opportunity for photography, then I visited Taynish.

 Taynish and Loch Sween.

Taynish and Loch Sween.

Taynish is a National Nature Reserve on the west coast of Scotland, west of Lochgilphead near the village of Tayvallich.
Situated on a peninsula in the heart of Knapdale, Taynish is one of the finest examples of ancient Atlantic oak woodland in Europe. With its parallel wooded ridges ‘knaps’ and waterlogged valley mires ‘dales’, Taynish forms a nucleus of mixed deciduous woodland, a remnant of the former Knapdale landscape.

 Oak and Ferns create a unique atmosphere.

Oak and Ferns create a unique atmosphere.

Having survived here for over 7000 years, this ‘temperate rainforest’ is home to a wealth of wildlife, mosses, lichens and ferns thrive in the mild, humid climate. A wide range of insect life including butterflies, moths and dragonflies flourish in rich grasslands and mires including the marsh fritillary, one of Europe’s most threatened butterflies.

 The light on the peninsular is incredible.

The light on the peninsular is incredible.

I've visited Scotland a lot over the last thirty years, climbing, running and walking, to be honest I was unaware of the National Nature Reserve's, there are more than 50 NNRs in Scotland and Taynish is one of the finest. When I next decide to head north to Scotland I shall make sure I've checked out the 'Scotland's National Nature Reserve' website first.

http://www.nnr-scotland.org.uk